Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Warbler Guy, is it true Kirkland's Warbler nests in Wisconsin annually? For how many years have nesting Kirkland's Warbler been found in Wisconsin?

Jimmy (in Fargo), in 2014, Kirtland's Warbler nested for the seventh consecutive nesting season in Wisconsin.
 A fine summary report is present at:

Highlights include noting 13 singing male Kirkland's were reported by monitors during the 2014 monitoring season in Wisconsin.

Three counties in Wisconsin hosted singing males, with one individual detected in Bayfield County, 1 in Marinette County, and 11 in Adams County.

Of course, a much larger population of this federally endangered songbird breeds annually in Michigan. Here, perhaps 500 Kirtland's Warbler are present during the breeding season, primarily in north/north-central Michigan counties.

In addition, one site in Ontario has also hosted recent breeding Kirkland's Warbler.

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Warbler Guy, is it common to see warblers during the winter? Are sightings of non-breeding season warblers typical in the East and Midwest?

Greg (in Baltimore), I could provide you details, yet definitely not better than the following fine article at Nemesis Bird that provides an explanation of "winter" warbler abundance for the East:


As for the West, say, in northern California where I live, the most typical warbler species to see (from most common to rarest in the order shown below) include:

- Yellow-rumped (both Myrtle and Audubon's subspecies occur in diverse habitats in great abundance, though Audubon's far outnumber the former);
- Common Yellowthroat (considered a resident throughout parts of n. CA, including the SF Bay Area) (male, immediately below and female below the male);

- Orange-crowned (although most depart annually be each autumn, a small number remain throughout the non-breeding season before they are again joined by returning migrants in February/March);
- Hermit (similar in abundance to the explanation noted for Orange-crowned, above);
- Palm (rare to absent during the non-breeding season, though often seen during the fall migration window....considered a vagrant sighting by many birders who observe this species in n. CA);
- Wilson's (even less common to detect during the non-breeding season than Orange-crowned and Hermit);
- Nashville (a few occur during the non-breeding season, but it's typically rare to absent)
- Black-throated Grey (rare to absent during the non-breeding season); and
- Yellow (although this species is common to see as a fall migrant throughout much of n. CA, it is usually rare to absent by November - March in this region).